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Posts Tagged ‘Bishop’

All Saints by Fra Angelico (Image: Wikimedia Commons)

October: Month of the Most Holy Rosary

November: Month of the Holy Souls

Sunday, October 30 – Feast of Christ the King (Traditional) / 31th Sunday in Ordinary Time (New)

St. Marcellus the Centurion (309), Martyr (Historical)

St. Alphonsus Rodriguez (1617), Widower, Lay Brother (Historical)

Monday, October 31 – All Hallows’ Eve

St. Wolfgag (994), Bishop of Ratisbon (Historical)

St. Quentin (287), Martyr (Historical)

Tuesday, November 1 – All Saints Day (Holy Day of Obligation)

Wednesday, November 2 – All Souls Day

Thursday, November 3

St. Martin de Porres (1639), Religious, Priest in South America (Traditional – some places, New)

St. Malachy O’More (1148), Primate of Armagh, Ireland (Historical)

Blessed Ida of Toggenburh (1226), Matron, Hermitess (Historical)

Friday, November 4 – First Friday, Obligatory Day of Abstinence (or Other Suitable Sacrifice)

St. Charles Borromeo (1584), Bishop, Cardinal, Patron of Seminarians (Traditional, New)

Sts. Vitalis and Agricola (3rd Century), Martyrs (Tradiational)

Saturday, November 5 – First Saturday

Feats of the Holy Relics Preserved in the Churches of the Diocese (Traditional – some places)

Sts. Zachary and Elizabeth (1st Century), Parents of St. John the Baptist (Historical)

St. Bertilla (692), Virgin, Religious, Abbes (Historical)

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Image: Wikimedia Commons

September 14 – Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross

From the Saint Andrew Daily Missal:

On September 14, in 335, took place the dedication of Constantine’s basilica, which enclosed both Calvary and the Holy Sepulchre. “At this date,” says Etheria, “the cross was discovered. And the anniversary is celebrated with as much solemnity as Easter or the Epiphany.” Such was the origin of the feast of the Exaltation of the Cross. “When I shall be raised on high, I shall draw everything unto Me” (Gospel), Jesus has said. It is because of the Saviour humbled Himself, being obedient even to the death of the cross, that God exalted Him and gave Him a name above all other names (Epistle). Wherefore we must glory in the cross of Jesus, for He is out live and our salvation (Introit) and He protects His servants against the wiles of their enemies (Offertory, Communion, Postcommunion).

Towards the end of the reign of Phocas, Chosroes, King of Persia, says the legend of the breviary, took Jerusalem, where he put to death several thousand Christians and carried off to Persia the Cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, which St. Helen had placed on mount Calvary.

Heraclius, the successor of Phocas, had recourse to many fasts and prayers, imploring with great fervor the help of God. He assembled an army and defeated Chosroes. He then insisted on the restitution of the cross of the Lord. Thus the precious relic was recovered after an interval of fourteen years. On his return to Jerusalem, Heraclius carried it on his shoulders in great pomp to the mountain where the Saviour Himself had borne it (A.D. 629).

An extraordinary miracle marked the occasion. Heraclius, who was loaded with ornaments of gold and precious stones, was held back by an invisible force at the entrance gate of mount Calvary and vain were his efforts to enter.

As the Emperor and all those who witnessed the scene were astonished, Zacharias, Bishop of Jerusalem, said to him: “Consider, O Emperor, that with these triumphal ornaments you are far from imitating the poverty of Jesus Christ and His humility in bearing His cross.” Heraclius thereupon doffed his splendid garb and walked barefooted with a common cloak on his shoulders to Calvary, where he again deposited the cross. The feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross on the original spot, the anniversary of which was celebrated on this day, became of great importance.

Let us join, in spirit, the faithful who in the Church of the Holy Cross at Rome venerate on this day the relics of the sacred wood exposed for the occasion, so that, having been privileged to adore it on this feast when we rejoice for its exaltation, we may likewise possess for all eternity the salvation and glory the Cross has won for us (Collect, Secret).

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St. Notburga (Image: Wikimedia Commons)

September – Month of Our Lady of Sorrows

Sunday, September 11 – 13th Sunday After Pentecost (Traditional) / 24nd Sunday in Ordinary Time (New)

Sts. Protus and Hyacinth (257), Brothers, Martyrs (Traditional)

St. Adelphus (5th c.), Bishop (Historical)

St. Paphnutius (356), Bishop (Historical)

Monday, September 12 – The Most Holy Name of Mary (Traditional / New)

Tuesday, September 13

St. John Chrysostom (407), Bishop, Doctor of the Church, Patron of Orators (New)

Wednesday, September 14 – Exaltation of the Holy Cross (335, 629) (Traditional / New)

St. Maternus (1st c.), Bishop (Historical)

St. Notburga (1313), Virgin, Patroness of Peasants, Servants, and the Poor (Historical)

Thursday, September 15 – The Seven Sorrows of Our Lady (Traditional) / Our Lady of Sorrows (New)

St. Nicomedes (90), Martyr (Traditional)

St. Catherine of Genoa (1510), Widow (Historical)

Friday, September 16 – Obligatory Day of Abstinence

St. Cornelius (253), Priest, Martyr and St. Cyprian (258), Bishop, Martyr (Traditional / New)

Sts. Euphemia, Lucy, and Geminianus (4th c.), Martyrs (Tradiationl)

Saturday, September 17

St. Robert Bellarmine (1621), Jesuit, Bishop, Cardinal, Doctor of the Church (New)

The Imprinting of the Stigmata of St. Francis of Assisi (1224) (Traditional)

St. Hildegarde (1179), Abbot (Historical)

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St Nicholas of Tolentino

September – Month of Our Lady of Sorrows

Sunday, September 4 – 12th Sunday After Pentecost (Traditional) / 23nd Sunday in Ordinary Time (New)

St. Rosalia (1166), Virgin, Patroness of Palermo, Sicily (Historical)

St. Rose of Viterbo (1252), Virgin (Historical)

St. Marinus (4th Century), Hermit (Historical)

Monday, September 5

St. Laurence Justinian (1455), Bishop, First Patriarch of Venice (Traditional)

St. Bertin (698), Abbot of Saint-Bertin (Historical)

Tuesday, September 6

Blessed Bertrand of Garrigues (13th Century), Priest (Historical)

St. Eleutherius (585), Religious (Historical)

Wednesday, September 7

St. Regina (286), Virgin, Martyr, Patroness of Poverty (Historical)

St. Cloud (560), Priest, Hermit (Historical)

Thursday, September 8 – Birth of the Blessed Virgin Mary (c. 15 BC) (Traditional / New)

St. Adrian (304), Martyr (Traditional)

St. Corbinian (Corbin) (725), Bishop (Historical)

Friday, September 9 – Obligatory Day of Abstinence

St. Peter Claver (1654), Priest, Jesuit, “Apostle of the Negroes” (Traditional – Some Places / New)

St. Gorgonius (303), Martyr (Traditional)

Saturday, September 10

St. Nicholas of Tolentino (1306), Priest, Religious, Patron of Mariners (Traditional)

St. Pulcheria (453), Virgin, Empress (Historical)

Bls. Apollinaris Franco, Charles Spinola, and Companions (1622), 205 Martyrs of Japan (Historical – Some Places)

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Pope St. Pius X (Image: Wikimedia Commons)

August – Month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary

September – Month of Our Lady of Sorrows

Sunday, August 28 – 11th Sunday After Pentecost (Traditional) / 22nd Sunday in Ordinary Time (New)

St. Augustine (430), Bishop, Doctor of the Church, Patron of Theologians (Traditional, New)

St. Hermes (132), Martyr (Traditional)

Monday, August 29 – Beheading of St. John the Baptist (c. 32) (Traditional, New)

St. Sabina (127), Martyr (Traditional)

St. Medericus (Merry) (700), Abbot (Historical)

Tuesday, August 30

St. Rose of Lima (1617), Virgin, First Canonized Saint of the Americas, Patroness of South America and Gardeners (Traditional)

Sts. Felix and Adauctus (304), Martyrs (Traditional)

St. Fiancre of Brie (670), Hermit, Patron of Gardeners and Cab Drivers (Historical)

Blessed Bronislava (1259), Virgin, Patroness of Happy Death and Disease Prevention (Historical)

Wednesday, August 31

St. Raymond Nonnatus (1240), Religious, Patron of Midwives (Traditional)

St. Aristedes (2nd Century) (Historical)

Thursday, September 1

St. Giles (724), Abbot, Patron of the Physically Disabled (Traditional)

Twelve Holy Brothers (258), Martyrs (Traditional)

St. Anna, the Prophetess (1st Century) (Historical)

Friday, September 2 – First Friday (Obligatory Day of Abstinence)

St. Stephen (1038), King of Hungary (Traditional)

St. Agricolus (700), Bishop, Patron of Avignon (Historical)

St. Ingrid of Sweden (1282), Virgin (Historical)

Saturday, September 3 – Fist Saturday

St. Gregory the Great (604), Priest, Doctor of the Church, Patron of Teachers and Music (New)

St. Pius X (1914), Pope (Traditional)

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The Sacraments of Baptism, Holy Eucharist, and Penance are arguably the three most important Sacraments in the life of the Church.  Without these three Sacraments, according to Jesus, it’s impossible to enter into the Kingdom of Heaven.  Baptism makes us adopted children of God and ushers us into His family.  The Sacrament of Penance removes the stain of sin, thereby allowing us to die in a state of grace worthy of a life in heaven. The Sacrament of Holy Eucharist gives us new life through the Body and Blood of Christ. Yet, we cannot approach the Sacrament of Holy Eucharist if we are in a state of sin; in sin we quite literally cut ourselves off from the Body of Christ. To find life in Christ, we simply must have ready access to the Sacrament of Penance.

Jesus is quite clear – if we die in a state of mortal sin, we’re out, all the way out.  Once we depart this life, there are no “second chances.”  There is no do-over.  We die and our soul receives final, eternal judgment.  To this, consider as well how easy it is for one to fall into mortal sin in today’s “anything goes” secular society which routinely promotes absolute perversion as “good.”  Perhaps more than any other time in history, temptation abounds.

While it’s not wise since it generally arises from being over-scrupulous, there is no theological barrier of which I’m aware that would prevent someone who doesn’t regularly partake in the Eucharist (but attends Mass) from gaining admission into Heaven (provided of course the person satisfies the Precepts of the Church which includes receiving the Eucharist at least once a year during Easter).  Yet, we very clearly risk non-admission into the Kingdom of Heaven by forgoing the Sacrament of Penance – not to mention the additional sinfulness of receiving the Eucharist while in a state of sin, especially mortal sin.

Give all this, why is Sacrament of Penance the least available and least promoted of the Sacraments?  If the parishioners are lucky, the average “Catholic” church today offers the Sacrament of Penance for perhaps thirty minutes in the middle of a Saturday afternoon.  Oh, sure, these churches often claim it’s available anytime – by advance appointment only, please.

Multiple “performances” of the liturgy are available all weekend with morning, matinee and evening shows all designed to work around your busy schedule – no advance reservation required, walk-ins welcome.  If you’re lucky, along with an ad-libbing MC (formerly known as a priest), in some cases, they might even throw in some clowns or “liturgical dances” for your “theological” entertainment.  But need someone to hear your confession?  Not likely.  Besides, once you do get in for your face-to-face wrap session (after all, Confessionals with partitions are so pre-Vatican II) with Father Friendly, he’ll probably tell you your sins aren’t really considered sins anymore, so don’t worry, be happy!

Father, forgive them for they know not what they do.

These churches often defend this lack of access to the Sacrament of Penance by claiming not many people show up on Saturday anyways, so it’d be a waste of time to offer it more often.  The majority of Catholics today suffer under pitiful “catechesis” inspired by the false “Spirit of Vatican II” – a “spirit” completely unsupported by the actual documents of Vatican II.  The average pew sitter is woefully misinformed about the Truths of the Faith.  Is it any wonder they’re not showing up at the confessional – especially when it’s in the middle of Saturday afternoon, which is the one day most families actually get some time in today’s hectic world to spend time together?  Frankly, I’m surprised anyone shows up at all.

However, I believe the movie line applies here, “Build it and they will come.”  Offer the Sacrament of Penance on a regular, accessible basis, teach the faithful about its importance and they will come, for if they truly desire salvation and unity with the Lord, they must come.

Every Mass offered by priests of SSPX and FSSP, to give but two examples, offer the Sacrament of Penance before the Mass – in addition to offering it at other times as well.  Quite a novel concept – the faithful show up at the church, participate in the Sacrament of Penance and then actively participate in the Mass with clean souls!  The Sacrament of Penance is offered on a regular, accessible basis and all the faithful participate.  Why is this process so difficult for regular “Catholic” parishes (or “communities” or “worship spaces” or whatever they’re calling themselves today) to implement? [Note: SSPX is mentioned here as an example to show that even a group with questionable standing in the Church at least understands the great importance of access to the Sacrament of Penance.]

Why, fathers and bishops, do so many of you insist on denying, or at least making very inconvenient, access to the Sacrament of Penance?  Sacred Scripture teaches that you are responsible for the souls of the faithful.  With responsibility comes accountability: You will be held to a higher standard than the un-ordained laity.  Stand up and follow many of your Holy Brethren by breathing new life into the Sacrament of Penance and leading the faithful into active participation in this live-saving and life-giving gift of God.

Ave Maria!

+JMJ

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St. Michael

Month of Our Lady of Sorrows (Sept) / Month of the Most Holy Rosary (Oct)

Sunday, September 26 – 18th Sunday after Pentecost (Traditional) / 26th Sunday in Ordinary Time (New)

Sts. Cosmas & Damian (283), twins, Martyrs, Patrons of Physicians and Pharmacists (New)

Sts. Cyprian & Justina (3rd c.), Martyrs (Traditional)

Sts. Isaac Jogues, John de Brebeuf, Priests and Companions (1642, 1646, 1648, 1649), Martyrs, Secondary Patrons of Canada (Traditional/some places)

Monday, September 27

St. Vincent de Paul (1660), Priest, Founder, Patron of All Charitable Societies (New)

Sts. Cosmas & Damian (283), twins, Martyrs, Patrons of Physicians and Pharmacists (Traditional)

Tuesday, September 28

St.Wenceslaus (929), Duke, Martyr, Patron of Bohemia (New, Traditional)

St. Lawrence Ruiz, Husband, Father and Companion (1633-1637), Martyr (New)

Blessed John of Dukla (1484), Religious (Historical)

Wednesday, September 29

Sts. Michael, Gabriel & Raphael, Archangels (New)

Dedication of the Basilica of St. Michael the Archangel (530), (Michaelmas Day) (Traditional)

Thursday, September 30

St. Jerome (420), Priest, Doctor of the Church, Translator of the Latin Vulgate Bible (New, Traditional)

Friday, October 1 – First Friday

(Obligatory Day of Abstinence from Meat or Substitution of Some Other Sacrifice)

St. Therese of Lisieux (1897), Virgin, Religious, Doctor of the Church, Patroness of All Foreign Missions (New)

St. Remigius (Remi) (530), Bishop (Traditional)

Saturday, October 2 – First Saturday

The Holy Guardian Angels (New, Traditional)

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